In Which I Bitch and Moan a Bit More

First, I would like to bitch about C#. I finally translated the whole state Brixen Java bean package into C# and both the C# and Java versions are fully unit-tested. Yay! Second, C# needs something like Lombok _ASAP_. I did not fully understand The Giant Teh Suck So Much that it is to write all this freaking boilerplate for ToString(), Equals() and GetHashCode() over and over again until I enjoyed not doing it for Java classes for the last year. It’s glorious to open up a class file and Not. See. That. Shit. I am bummed there is no way to do the decorator pattern in C# as I have done it in Java. That little beauty of a design pattern _really_ cuts down on boilerplate. And Equals() for collections such as Dictionary, the equivalent of Map for Java, totally blows because it does reference equality, not ‘contains the same shit’ equality like Java Map implementations do. Seriously… what the fuck? Who thought that was a good idea? This took far far longer than I thought it would. I thought I would be done with the C# translation before Christmas and that I would be blazing through the Python implementation by now. Writing unit tests is tedious and time-consuming, but having caught some bugs with them, I am happy I have committed to doing them in tandem with the C# translation. But enough about that. Brixen marches onward and the source is available here. Looks like someone forked my repo a while back. I am flattered.

Today, I am _not_ gruntled. Far from it. You probably would have guessed that from the mere fact that there is a new post today. I had my annual performance review and the result was good, but not spectacular. I feel satisfied with this outcome and it is what I expected. This was a rocky year for me, and I did a few things which embarrassed the QA director. I publicly contradicted his goals and strategy on a fairly high-level initiative he was pushing, and I chewed out the Principal SDET over email for checking crappy page objects into the core of the automation framework without so much as a word with me over it. So, the chickens are coming home to roost for me. I have always had a mouth that got me into trouble before my rational brain could stop me. I have a habit of just expressing things in a way that others find too blunt and not diplomatic enough. I also have a temper.

Today was one of the days in which my rational brain was too slow out of the gate to catch up with my mouth. A junior developer is taking on the task of translating the regression suite I wrote to run against the new, totally rebuilt front end. I expected this task to be difficult for her. The regressions suite tests the application that has the biggest, most complicated UI in the entire customer portal. That shit is hard and complicated and the page object modeling is a non-trivial challenge. Today, she called a code review that included me, the Principal SDET and two other team members. In the midst of the code review, the question came up about labels I have attached to the test cases in JIRA which are reproduced on the test method as group names. I have a longer term plan for using those labels and the group name mappings as a way to dynamically select methods for specific functionality on the fly so that a developer can trigger a build that selects tests that cover the functionality they touched in their commit. Principal SDET claimed I had agreed to take the labels off the Jira test cases and the test methods. Problem is, I have near perfect memory for conversations going back months, and I knew that I had not agreed to do that. In fact, she and the QA director had backed down from it when it last came up. I disagreed with this assertion and before I knew it we were shouting at each other over the phone and she was refusing to explain why the presence of these labels was harmful to anyone.

After a chat with the QA director, I will be doing a presentation next week to explain why I did this and where it is going and then put it forth to the team to decide to chuck this or not. If they decide to chuck it, then I will copy all my work elsewhere and continue implementing a parallel test suite that uses this plumbing and present it to the development team when it is ready because this whole thing was meant to help them anyway. I have no idea where this came from and it is not the first time an issue which had been settled has been raised again from the dead where I am told I have to change how I did something without getting a clear explanation for why I need to. I am getting… weary of this. Principal SDET has a habit of honing in on trivial, non-architectural things which harm no one and making a giant fucking deal out of them. Test data storage formats are a giant bugaboo and apparently everything must and should be stored in a Java Properties file even though Java Properties files are flat, key/value pairs and there is no tooling I know of or that she can point me to which will allow me to suck in a Java Properties file containing serialized data that represents collections of objects and their state and instantiate collections of POJOs with it. At one point, the directory structure of the framework was a giant burning issue. If someone checked something into the wrong directory or tried to use Maven modules to manage multiple, related projects, they were not following ‘architectural’ guidelines. I have no idea what important architectural implications any of this has since they have NO EFFECT on how any particular subsystem interfaces with any other subsystem.

The code review barely touched on anything related to actual form and function of code. I don’t know if it is worth it in the long haul to stick around in this role. I like the challenge of the stuff I work on, but this perennial micromanagement and drama is getting really old.

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