Fumbling Around Like a Total N00b: Translating Brixen from Java to C#

I spent a week scratching my head over failed unit tests that were ultimately the result of jackass n00b mistakes, and sadly, they were not C# n00b mistakes, but Coding 101 n00b mistakes like not checking for null and failing to actually set the value of a property after validating the parameter for its setter method. Oh, and leaving off the parentheses for a method call. Thankfully, I didn’t turn to Stack Overflow for help. My reputation would have taken a severe nosedive for requesting help with such embarrassingly basic bugs. And this, my friends, is why you should write unit tests. It saves you from checking dumbass Coding 101 mistakes like this into source control where they can be found by your co-workers who might be tempted to slowly freeze you out from the important and rewarding work because they just can’t trust you to write a decent for-loop without a user’s manual at your side.

I still haven’t figured out how to write an integrated build script for Brixen that would compile, test and deploy both brixen-java and brixen-dotnet. I did however, take the time to learn some basic Nunit framework usage so that I could actually write some unit tests. I also tried to integrate Nlog logging into the unit tests, but for some reason, the logging statements don’t get output to the console in Xamarin Studio, so I took it out. I think I need to try this on a Windows system with Visual Studio.

When I started coding, I realized I had no idea how a standard .NET project should be organized. I went in search of a guide and found that finding such a thing was not all that easy. It’s as if there is this pervasive assumption in the .NET coding community that you should just know how to structure a .NET project by osmosis. With Maven, there is a well-documented project structure and there’s generally no question where something should live. Java enforces a directory structure convention for packages which does not exist in the C# world. YouTube came to my rescue in the form of a short, awesome video tutorial where the creator of the video explained that these things are in fact often hard to figure out because they are not explicitly documented by Microsoft.

After basically learning the basics of a totally different tool chain, I finally got something that I could check into the Brixen GitHub repo that I was not ashamed to call my own. So far, I’ve only translated a handful of the state beans into C#, but things should move faster now that I have surmounted some of the learning curve. The code is definitely going to be more verbose than the Java version due to the lack of a tool like Lombok. I have to write implementations of ToString(), GetHashChode() and Equals(Some Object) which is tedious. In Java, I can just throw a couple annotations on a class and these methods are auto-generated at compile time by Lombok. I’ve updated the corresponding Java classes too. In the source code I presented at the Selenium conference, I did not do any parameter validation for the setter methods because I wanted to cut down on the sheer volume of code I had to present. I am now adding back in the parameter validation that I cut out because it’s just a good idea to validate parameters. So, the Java code is more verbose than the code from my presentation.

The Decorator translation is a little harder to pull off in C# because I have to use extension methods to produce something like the default method implementations that Java 8 allows, but at least, thankfully, it is possible to do. I treated myself to the pleasure of reading explanations of why Java 8 was just totally wrong for allowing this atrocity into the language because it violates the very definition of an interface. This may be true, but default interface methods are just astoundingly convenient in ways that justifies the atrocity in my opinion.

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